Jessie’s Girl

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Learn how to play Jessie’s Girl on guitar.

 

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Online Guitar Tab is dedicated to helping guitarists worldwide gain access to chords, tabs, and tutorials for many of the top guitar songs. Access the video tutorial for a free guitar lesson or view the Rick Springfield – Jessie’s Girl guitar chords below.

 

Jessie’s Girl Tab

Intro: C G Am F G C (2x)

Verse:
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C G Am F G C (4x)
Jessie is a friend
Yeah I know, he’s been a good friend of mine
But lately something’s changed, it ain’t hard to define
Jessie’s got himself a girl, and I wanna make her mine

Pre-chorus:

C (C) Am F G
And she’s watching him with those eyes
C (C) Am F G
And she’s loving him with that body, I just know it
C (C) Am F G C G
And he’s holding her in his arms, late late at night

Chorus:
(see note at end)
G C G Am Gsus4 Am Gsus4 (2x)
You know, I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
F G C Am G
Where can I find her, a woman like that?

Verse 2:

I play along with the charade
There doesn’t seem to be a reason to change
You know I feel so dirty when they start talking cute
I want to tell her that I love her but the point is probably moot

Pre-chorus (same as above):

‘Cause she’s watching him with those eyes
And she’s loving him with that body, I just know it
And he’s holding her in his arms, late late at night

Chorus:

You know I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
Where can I find her, a woman like that?

Repeat chorus, last line twice (chords change slightly):

Like Jessie’s girl
I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
F G C F G C Where can I find her, a woman
F G C Am G
Where can I find her, a woman like that?

Bridge:

(Lead plays the chords shown below, as indicated;
everyone else stays on F through the bridge,
until the final G, at “supposed to be”)

F C G (2x) (F G = D shapes at 5 and 7, C at 7)

F C G (4x)
And I’m looking in the mirror all the time
Wond’ring what she don’t see in me
Yeah I’ve been funny I’ve been cool with the lines
Ain’t that the way love’s supposed to be?

E A E F#m Esus4 F#m Esus4 (4x)
(Just like the chorus riff, but 1.5 steps lower)

F G C Am G
Tell me, where can I find her a woman like that?

Solo: Verse chords ( C G Am F G C ) 4x

Chorus (with one extra repeat):

You know I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
I want Jessie’s girl
Where can I find her, a woman like that?

Chorus again, as above but without last line:

Like Jessie’s girl
I wish that I had Jessie’s girl
I want, I want Jessie’s girl

G C G C G F C

———————————-

Note:

For the chorus, you can try it with open chords, like this:

G C G Am Gsus4 Am Gsus4
e—————————————————-
B——-1-1-1—0—1—1—1—1——————–
G—0—0-0-0—0—2—0—2—0——————–
D—0—2-2-2—0—2—0—2—0——————–
A—2—3-3-3—————————————-
E—3————————————————

or barred like so:

G C G Am Gsus4 Am Gsus4
e—————————————————-
B——-5-5-5—————————————-
G——-5-5-5——-5—5—5—5——————–
D—5—5-5-5—5—7—5—7—5——————–
A—5—3-3-3—5—7—5—7—5——————–
E—3———–3—5——————————–

Is this tab too difficult? Click here to learn how to make it easier.

 

Learn How To Play Rick Springfield Jessie’s Girl Guitar Chords

rick springfield jessies girl guitar chordsRick Springfield’s “Jessie’s Girl” is one of those songs that pretty much everyone has heard at some in their life. It became a huge hit after its release in 1981, topping charts in every imaginable respect. To this day, it’s still all over the radio and can be heard in many movies such as 13 Going On 30 and Boogie Nights. Despite its place as a 80s pop hit, Springfield is a guitarist by trade and the song itself is built around rock style power chord guitars. It’s a pretty fun song to play, so stick around if you want to learn where to start.

Jessie’s Girl is a great song to study if you want to learn some of the most useful song writing tools in general. Dynamics – where one part of the song contrasts the other so that they stand out from one another – are very important, and that’s in full display here given the quiet first half of each verse. The verses are a simple pattern of power chords, switching between D (5th position, played with your root note on the A string), A (5th position on E), B (7th position on E), G (3rd position on E), and then back to A and D.

To change how the famous verse pattern sounds between the quiet first half and more powerful second half, just lightly mute the strings at first by playing your picking hand palm just barely over the bridge of the strings. When the second half starts, move your palm off the bridge and let the chords ring out more loudly. This is dynamics 101, and a great way to squeeze an awful lot out of a single riff.

The equally famous chorus is up next, and it starts off with 8 counts of a palm muted A power chord that you should gradually pick harder as it goes. The chorus itself utilizes the same chords as the verse in a different order, this time A, D, A, B, A, B, A repeated three times, then G, A, D, B, A. Only use down strokes with your pick if you want this part to stand out even more. You can even temporarily mute the strings between each chord to give them a staccato feel, meaning there are quick bursts notes or chords that only ring out for a very short time.

After repeating from the verse, your second chorus is a double chorus, meaning that it repeats itself. Once you get to the pattern change on the third bar, repeat it again and play the entire chorus the same way as you did the first time. After that comes the bridge, the hardest part of the song.

The bridge uses a B, A, and C sharp chord pattern that you can play with the open B and G strings, then third fret B, second fret G, and 2nd fret B, second fret G. A palm muted G power chord plays in between each chord, and you can string skip to play the entire part on one guitar if you’re quick enough. The next riff is a modulated version of the first half of the chorus, 3 steps lower to G sharp.

The regular second half of the chorus is up next, which goes right into a solo based in D that plays right over the chorus. A second double chorus closes out the song. A new pattern using the same chords is used as a final outro, changing between A, D, A, D, A, G, A, and ending on a final D.