The Letter

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Learn how to play The Letter on guitar.

 

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Online Guitar Tab is dedicated to helping guitarists worldwide gain access to chords, tabs, and tutorials for many of the top guitar songs. Access the video tutorial for a free guitar lesson or view The Box Tops – The Letter guitar chords below.

 

The Letter Tab

Am F
Gimme a ticket for an aeroplane,
G D
Ain’t got time to take a fast train.
Am F
Lonely days are gone, I’m a-goin’ home,
E7 Am
My baby just wrote me a letter.

Is this tab too difficult? Click here to learn how to make it easier.

Am F
I don’t care how much money I gotta spend,
G D
Got to get back to my baby again
Am F
Lonely days are gone, I’m a-goin’ home,
E7 Am
My baby just wrote me a letter.

C G
Well, she wrote me a letter
F C G
Said she couldn’t live without me no mo’.
C G F C
Listen mister can’t you see I got to get back
G E E7
To my baby once a-mo’–anyway…

Am F
I don’t care how much money I gotta spend,
G D
Got to get back to my baby again
Am F
Lonely days are gone, I’m a-goin’ home,
E7 Am
My baby just wrote me a letter.

C G
Well, she wrote me a letter
F C G
Said she couldn’t live without me no mo’.
C G F C
Listen mister can’t you see I got to get back
G E E7
To my baby once a-mo’–anyway…

Am F
Gimme a ticket for an aeroplane,
G D
Ain’t got time to take a fast train.
Am F
Lonely days are gone, I’m a-goin’ home,
E7 Am
My baby just wrote me a letter.
E7 Am
My baby just wrote me a letter.

Is this tab too difficult? Click here to learn how to make it easier.

OUTRO:
C# G# D#m C# G#
C# G# D#m C# G#
C# G# D#m C# G#

Learn To Play The Box Tops: The Letter Guitar Chords

the letter guitar chords the box tops“The Letter” is a well known pop rock song originally released in 1967, composed and written by Wayne Carson Thompson and performed by The Box Tops. Though it may be more known as a popular cover song – done up by acts such as Joe Cocker and The Ventures – the original has been widely recognized as a classic of the era. It’s even been ranked on one of Rollin Stones’ many “greatest songs of all time” lists. Given its popularity, the song makes for a fun “jam song.” The following paragraphs will tell you all you need to know about playing “The Letter” on guitar. 

The original recording of The Letter was played on an acoustic guitar, though it will sound just fine on an electric provided you’re using your clean channel. Outside of the intro, the song is built around a small number of chord changes. The tempo is fairly moderate, so there’s nothing too difficult here. If you’re just starting out, this will be a good way to practice up on switching between different chord shapes. If you’re an intermediate or advanced player, you’ll find a bit of “back to basics” fun here, and maybe brush up on your chords in the process.

The intro begins with an 8 count on the snare drum. There’s nothing out of the ordinary there, but the guitar part begins on the sixth count rather than the fifth, creating a refreshing and unexpected beginning. This really grabs your attention, especially considering the sparseness of the instrumentation up to that point. The guitar pattern is a quick 7 note arpeggio played across the bottom 3 strings. You can anchor your hand around the second fret to make it easier for yourself. The first and fifth notes are played on open strings – the E and D respectively – so it’s pretty easy to pull off. The pattern is as follows: open E, 4th fret E, 2nd fret A, 2nd fret D, open D, 3rd fret A, and it ends on 2nd fret A.

The verses are comprised of 5 chords. That’s right, that little jab everyone throws around about rock songs only having 3 chords is often proven terribly untrue. The first pattern revolves around switching from A minor to F to G and then finally D. You can only play the upper 3 or 4 strings in the F shape if the full barre chord is tough for you. From there, you repeat once more, but your third chord change will be E instead of G, and then you end back on A minor again instead of the D.

You’ll notice that the chords almost have a stuttering sound to the rhythm. To accomplish this, all you have to do is bring your fingers slightly off of the fret board in between the audible strums. This will slightly mute the strings, allowing you to get that stuttered effect. String muting is a very useful tool that will allow you to get a lot more expression and even percussive feel out of your rhythm playing, and it’s more and more important as you begin playing modern songs.